jimmyjon
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2015 11:13 pm

Autonomous Driving

Sat Jul 29, 2017 10:28 pm

AUTOS INDUSTRY
House Panel Clears Self-Driving-Car Bill
The Wall Street Journal.
Jul 27, 2017
A U.S. House panel approved legislation regarding self-driving cars, a significant step aimed at clarifying the rules of the road for manufacturers developing vehicles that pilot themselves.
The U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee cleared the bill, which would bar states from setting driverless-car rules that conflict with federal standards, on a 54-0 vote Thursday morning. Auto makers have been concerned about a patchwork of state-by-state driverless-car regulations.
The legislation would require companies to submit safety-assessment certifications to U.S. regulators—a practice already urged in automated-vehicle policy, but that lacks legal force—and then prevent the federal government from halting the deployment or testing of automated vehicles while the assessment is reviewed.
The bill also eventually would allow exemptions from existing U.S. safety regulations to companies that deploy up to 100,000 vehicles each. The legislation would require a publicly searchable database of each exempted vehicle. The exemptions are intended to prevent delays in technological advancements that could improve vehicle safety.
U.S. officials spanning the Obama and Trump administrations have been attempting to balance safety concerns with rapid technological development among self-driving-car makers.
Driverless cars are expected to aid the elderly and disabled, ease congestion and pollution, and cut traffic fatalities, 94% of which are attributed to human error, according to government officials and industry experts. Current U.S. safety standards cover vehicles with human drivers, and the bill would require the transportation secretary to eventually present lawmakers with a plan for developing rules addressing self-driving cars.
Auto makers have been selling vehicles with semiautonomous features—including automatic emergency braking and adaptive cruise control—and are racing to master cars and trucks that can operate without input from a driver.
The exemptions from existing U.S. safety standards in the bill would initially be capped at 25,000 vehicles for each company in the first year before climbing to 100,000 a piece over three years. Car makers would have to demonstrate their vehicles’ safety to receive the exemption.
The bill also requires that vehicles eventually have an alarm system alerting motorists to check rear seats when shutting down the engine, which is intended to reduce the number of children left unattended in cars.
While the bill would bar states from setting their own driverless-car rules, the states would still keep traditional powers to address matters such as licenses, safety and emissions inspections and crash investigations, under the legislation’s parameters. It also attempts to clarify that it doesn’t pre-empt state dealer-franchise laws.
The legislation still needs to clear the full House, with a vote expected as soon as September, and then be reconciled with any similar Senate bill before heading to President Donald Trump’s desk, which could take a number of months.


How do you feel about driverless vehicles? My one big questions is when there is an accident who's fault will it be? At this point the technology is based on "if " & "then" algorihms. At some point the algorithm will instruct to make the least fatal mistake - so again who is to blame?

ginforce
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2016 11:58 pm

Re: Autonomous Driving

Mon Jul 31, 2017 8:10 pm

I have watched a lot of videos of the driverless car and all seems great but there has been no direct instruction from any resource I have read that states when the vehicle is going to enter in a situation where every option is not a success what that vehicle is programmed to do. I worry if I am sitting in my driverless car doing something else and a scenario comes up where I will be hit by an on coming car and my car moves to safety but hits a pedestrian - what is the car programmed to do in this situation? I haven't read anything that makes me think driverless cars are ready right now, maybe in the future. Let's not forget the big question - Who is to blame???? How will insurance work? It scares me a little at this point

Laev
Posts: 118
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2016 3:07 am

Re: Autonomous Driving

Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:14 am

ginforce wrote:I have watched a lot of videos of the driverless car and all seems great but there has been no direct instruction from any resource I have read that states when the vehicle is going to enter in a situation where every option is not a success what that vehicle is programmed to do. I worry if I am sitting in my driverless car doing something else and a scenario comes up where I will be hit by an on coming car and my car moves to safety but hits a pedestrian - what is the car programmed to do in this situation? I haven't read anything that makes me think driverless cars are ready right now, maybe in the future. Let's not forget the big question - Who is to blame???? How will insurance work? It scares me a little at this point


These are concerns - ligitimate concerns

Laev
Posts: 118
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2016 3:07 am

Re: Autonomous Driving

Thu Aug 10, 2017 2:17 am

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/tr ... 24c82b7f9f

The Washinton post thinks liablity will shift to the auto manufacturer when a self driving car gets into an accident

ginforce
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2016 11:58 pm

Re: Autonomous Driving

Thu Aug 17, 2017 2:01 am

Laev wrote:https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/trafficandcommuting/when-driverless-cars-crash-who-gets-the-blame-and-pays-the-damages/2017/02/25/3909d946-f97a-11e6-9845-576c69081518_story.html?utm_term=.5924c82b7f9f

The Washinton post thinks liablity will shift to the auto manufacturer when a self driving car gets into an accident


This doesn't actually make me feel better. I will have to see if the wording is in its entirety and doesn't somehow put it back on the driver in a clever way like extended furniture warranty doesn't cover much in its clever wording

new2evs
Posts: 72
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2015 11:13 pm

Re: Autonomous Driving

Thu Aug 17, 2017 2:06 am

The thing is I buy a car to drive the car. If I don't want to drive then I use a taxi or car service or some other form of transit. In no way do I want the responsibility of driving left up to a robot or AI source that is not unilaterally being used. Seems like such a stupid idea yet most people are really excited about it and behind it - crazy

nogas
Posts: 117
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:10 am

Re: Autonomous Driving

Wed Oct 11, 2017 5:01 pm

Now is the time to plan for the autonomous vehicle future
TechCrunch
Tom Alberg and Craig MundieOct 11, 2017
The arrival of autonomous vehicles bring the prospect of improved transportation systems without the capital costs, operating subsidies and construction delays of new highway lanes and fixed rail systems. Cities, states, and the Federal Government, need to revise their transportation planning accordingly.
Autonomous vehicles have gone from a Jetson-like dream to a clear reality in less than one decade. In 2010, when Google first started developing autonomous vehicles, people asked, “Why are they wasting money on this? That’s never going to work.”
Today, we have not only seen public pilots of autonomous vehicles from companies like Uber and recent announcement by automakers such as Audi that it plans to begin selling, in 2018, a production car with Level 3 autonomy (meaning it requires no human attention to the road at speeds under 37 miles per hour), we have also begun to see striking data on the benefits of autonomous vehicles.
For example, after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration investigated a Tesla Autopilot crash, they found a 40% decrease in traffic accidents when Tesla’s Autopilot feature was enabled in cars. In addition to significant reductions in accidents, the benefits of autonomous vehicles will also include less congestion, reduced emissions, reclaimed productive time, fewer new roads, reclaimed parking space, lower transportation costs for all and improved mobility of the elderly and disabled.

As traffic planners across the nation wrestle with the issues of moving people and goods within and between cities, there are a variety of transportation options to consider with everything from Hyperloop, to highways, bridges, buses, and light rail.
One thing that these projects all have in common is large-scale infrastructure projects which take a long time (often multiple decades) and require large up-front capital investments. Examples include the Big Dig in Boston, which cost nearly $15B, began in 1982 and was not completed until 2007; and in Seattle, the Alaskan Way Viaduct replacement, which began in 2001 and is not expected to be completed until 2021, at a cost of more than $4B.
Incorporating autonomous vehicles into our transportation systems, on the other hand, is a very low cost way to drastically improve the flow of goods and people within a region as long as we begin now to make the policy changes that will allow the benefits to be achieved as the technology comes to market.
Here in Seattle, we are proposing to convert Interstate-5 between Seattle and Vancouver, over a number of years, into an autonomous vehicle-only highway. Seattle and Vancouver are vibrant cities, but the transportation between them is tedious and impedes valuable economic partnerships.
Our proposal, which could be applied to many main Interstate highways and local limited-access thoroughfares, is to begin turning carpool lanes into autonomous vehicle lanes as early as next year.

Recall that HOV lanes were created as an incentive for commuters to change their behaviors. It is time to use that incentive to accelerate the move to the fututre architecture of transportation. As the number of autonomous vehicles grows over the coming decade, we could gradually dedicate entire lanes exclusively to AVs (and perhaps fit three AV lanes into the space of two traditional car lanes). Eventually, the entire highway would become autonomous-only.
While some stakeholders believe it is still too early to begin planning for autonomous vehicles on public roads, at the current rate of technological progress and with the early data suggesting drastic improvements in traffic safety, we believe we will reach a major tipping point during the coming decade, well within the time frame of a major transportation project.
The very same computing advances that allow your cell phones, computers, tablets and other gadgets to recognize you and respond to your voice now underpin the enabling of cars to achieve more and more autonomous operation. In the computing world these advances proceed quickly, with society adopting them en masse.

The only thing that will delay the arrival of autonomous vehicles in the U.S.A. will be timidity on the part of regulators and legislatures to give the public the chance to take them up at a similar rate.
There are still many questions in introducing autonomous vehicles into our current transportation systems– what level of autonomony will be required for inattentive driving under various conditions, will most people continue to own cars, how will street parking change -- but dealing with these issues is clearly less expensive than the massive investment of building new highways, bridges, or rail lines.
Autonomous vehicles offer a plethora of benefits to cities and their tax payers -- fast to market, low investment requirements, and many societal benefits ranging from fewer accidents to broader access to low-cost transportation.
Transit planners across the country should accelerate their consideration of the importance of autonomous vehicles as they map out their plans for the future of city and interstate transportation. These changes will be as important as the construction of the Interstate Highways System in the last century. It is time to get going...

ginforce
Posts: 94
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2016 11:58 pm

Re: Autonomous Driving

Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:47 am

Here is something new that came out in this area

Waymo’s self-driving Safety Report is all about reassuring passengers
SlashGear
Chris Davies · Oct 12, 2017

Waymo, the Alphabet business working on autonomous cars, has released its first safety report, a recap of 3.5m miles of on-road activity. Intended to reassure potential passengers – and wary regulators – that self-driving vehicles are “safer by design,” the report covers everything from incidents through to backup systems. It also digs into what sort of interactions with a driverless vehicle passengers might expect.
“Fully self-driving vehicles will succeed in their promise and gain public acceptance only if they are safe,” the company writes. “That’s why Waymo has been investing in safety and building the processes that give us the con dence that our self-driving vehicles can serve the public’s need for safer transportation and better mobility.”
Autonomous vehicles need to address four basics, Waymo explains. First, they need to perceive the environment around them to understand where they are; next, they need to spot what else is around them. Third, they have to predict what might happen next in that environment, and finally they have to reach a decision based on all of that information.
As we’ve seen, it’s a complex combination of cameras, radar and other sensors, LIDAR laser rangefinders, and a whole host of onboard computers, mashing that data up with high-resolution maps that’s responsible for doing all that. Waymo cars can see up to 984 feet away in all directions, using computer vision to classify other cars, cyclists, pedestrians, and other road users and potential hazards. There are even microphones that listen out for police and other emergency services sirens.

Of course, it’s worth remembering that Waymo’s real-world testing is only a fraction of the total number of miles its autonomous systems have had to deal with. The company makes heavy use of simulated driving and modeling, putting the software through its paces dealing with virtual challenges to refine the algorithms. That, Waymo says, currently amounts to billions more miles: 2.5bn in 2016 alone.
What that driving won’t do is stray from a pre-defined area. That’s because Waymo is relying on high-definition mapping completed before the car goes roaming out in public, including details down to lane topography and more. Indeed, “passengers cannot select a destination outside of our approved geography, and our software will not create a route that travels outside of a “geo-fenced” area, which has been mapped in detail” Waymo says.
Interestingly, the safety report arrives in the same week that the California DMV announced it planned to significantly loosen one of its more restrictive limitations on autonomous car testing. Until now, companies testing such vehicles on public roads have been required to have a human safety driver behind the wheel. That person was there to take over, should the system fail to handle the situation correctly.
With the new proposed regulations, expected to come into effect in mid-2018, that human backup needn’t be inside the car. Instead the DMV has suggested, it could be a remote person, just as long as they’re fully capable of bringing the driverless vehicle to a safe state in an incident. They must also be able to communicate in both directions with anybody within the car.

Waymo says it has a full operations center which can report a crash and interact with law enforcement and first responders, in addition to “rider specialists” who can communicate with passengers. There’s a redundant cellular connection between operations center and car, with encryption used to secure those conversations. However, the vehicles themselves are self-sufficient when it comes to actually driving: they don’t rely on cloud-processing, which could be affected by network downtime.
In the cabin, there are displays which show what the car is seeing and reacting to, details on the destination and ETA, and a “Pull Over” button. If pressed, that prompts the vehicle to automatically pull over to the nearest safest place to stop. There’s also a mobile app for summoning the vehicle and setting the destination. In-cabin controls have braille legends for vision-impaired riders, and the car can verbalize what it’s doing.
We’re still some way from autonomous cars having free rein on public highways, though several states are pushing ahead with the legislation that would pave the way to that. Still, Waymo’s new safety report addresses another lingering issue: that of public acceptance for driverless vehicles. After all, even if the laws and regulations allow it, you have to lure passengers inside.


Image

Well looks like they are still using the Pacifica so that is encouraging as they must feel it has good safety features ;) Too many questions they still have to work out like how does the self driving vehicle handle emergency vehicles or an accident situation in front, back or to the side of them - what about bridges??? The title is that the goal is to reassure passengers - what about other drivers !!!??

Return to “Off Topic”